Pumpkin Ale

While pumpkin beers were produced in the early days of the American colonies, they were different from the pumpkin beers we know today. Colonists used pumpkin and squash as the fermenting medium, since malted barley was scarce. Once malt became more readily available, it replaced these alternatives to grain. In the 1990’s, American craft brewers reintroduced the style to the delight of pumpkin beer drinkers.

Belgian Golden Ale

Beers from this region reflected the diversity of Belgium itself, a nation that has three official languages (Dutch, French, and German). Bordering Germany and France, Belgian ales incorporate the complex flavors of French wine into the German brewing heritage. In Post World War II Europe, Belgian brewers developed golden strong ales to compete with the rising popularity of lighter Pilsner style beers.

Irish-Style Extra Stout

Extra Stout is a descendent of the British and Irish porters of the 18th Century. These strong porters eventually became known as strong stout, then Foreign Stout or Extra Stout, depending on origin. Extra Stouts were exported world-wide, gaining popularity in the West Indies, Africa and parts of Asia.

Tasmanian IPA

India Pale Ales (IPAs) were first brewed in England during the late 1700s for export overseas to British soldiers in India. To keep their beer from spoiling during the long voyage, English brewers fortified their traditional pale ale recipes with natural preservatives: more malted barley, for a higher alcohol content, and more hops. In recent decades, with growing appreciation for highly hopped beers, American craft brewers have revived the style, embraced it, and incorporated new hop varieties.